Politics in Australia

In a statement on Tuesday, though, he denied linking his donations to foreign policy. “I expect nothing in return,” he said. “While some seek to reinforce negative stereotypes about Chinese involvement in Australia, I am committed to more positive pursuits.”

You can measure their pessimism in polls that ask about their expectations for their lives—and for those of their children. On both counts, whites without a college degree express the bleakest view. You can see the effects of their despair in the new statistics describing horrifying rates of suicide and substance-abuse fatality among this same group, in middle age.

Australian Politics – You Pay, 113 Diplomats Fly Home To Julie ...

The angriest and most pessimistic people in America aren’t the hipster protesters who flitted in and out of Occupy Wall Street. They aren’t the hashtavists of #BlackLivesMatter. They aren’t the remnants of the American labor movement or the savvy young dreamers who confront politicians with their American accents and un-American legal status. The angriest and most pessimistic people in America are the people we used to call Middle Americans. Middle-class and middle-aged; not rich and not poor; people who are irked when asked to press 1 for English, and who wonder how white male became an accusation rather than a description. You can measure their pessimism in polls that ask about their expectations for their lives—and for those of their children. On both counts, whites without a college degree express the bleakest view. You can see the effects of their despair in the new statistics describing horrifying rates of suicide and substance-abuse fatality among this same group, in middle age.
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The Hollowmen of Australian politics - ABC News (Australian ...

The most popular news channel in the Arab world sits uneasily at the center of the Qatar crisis. Earlier this month, managers at Al Jazeera, the most popular news channel in the Arab world, summoned nervous journalists into a glass-paneled conference room in the network’s headquarters in Doha. A coalition of Arab states led by Saudi Arabia had just imposed an embargo on Qatar, closing its airspace and expelling thousands of Qatari citizens. One of the conditions for lifting the blockade, according to a list leaked on Thursday, was reportedly the closure of Al Jazeera. The network’s leadership wanted to reassure its staff that their jobs were safe. “We’re not planning any changes right now,” journalists were told, according to two participants in the meeting. That left quite a bit unsaid. (I resigned from Al Jazeera English in mid-2013 after working there for nearly four years.)

Normally, a bill this unpopular wouldn’t stand a chance. But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s health-care bill seems designed to let reluctant senators amend it, and claim victory. The United States has never had a Senate leader as ruthless, as willing to bend, distort and break the rules, traditions and precedents of the Senate as Mitch McConnell. And the Senate has probably never had a majority leader as effective at accomplishing his goals as Mitch McConnell—making even Lyndon Johnson look like a neophyte in comparison. That is why no one should believe that the McConnell-crafted health-policy bill is dead, despite the growing opposition and the fact that the overwhelming majority of health-policy analysts and health providers say the bill is a walking disaster. It eviscerates Medicaid—a program widely misunderstood as simply insurance for poor people, but which uses most of its money for long-term care for the elderly, and basic protection for the disabled and mentally ill populations. The overall Medicaid cuts, while spread over a longer time frame, are more severe than the draconian House bill.

Australian Politics - RIC Publications Educational Resources
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Political Science is the study of human relationships that involve power, rule, or authority. It is about how societies govern themselves and how societies ought to be governed. It is about the political behaviour of individuals and groups that occurs in all societies. It is about those who have political power in society and those who do not. This specialized minor will consider these issues in the context of Australia and provide students with the opportunity to examine in more detail the nature of Australian Politics. Upon completion of a Bachelor Degree with a minor in Australian Politics, graduates will be able to: Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of political institutions and the workings of government in Australia.Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of broader social and political forces influencing government in Australia.

But in the rest of the world, and even in Australia until recent years, it’s been relatively rare. Usually a party changes leaders after some big general-election defeat. What makes it all the odder and cozier is that the Abbott-Turnbull switch has parallels to the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd sequence, in that Turnbull was the Liberal leader until Abbott unseated him as leader of the opposition, by a single vote, in 2009.

In 2011, 73% of church-going Australian Christians opposed same-sex marriage, but that is only a small portion of the population. The political majority against same-sex marriage is not predominantly a religious one.

The United States has never had a Senate leader as ruthless, as willing to bend, distort and break the rules, traditions and precedents of the Senate as Mitch McConnell. And the Senate has probably never had a majority leader as effective at accomplishing his goals as Mitch McConnell—making even Lyndon Johnson look like a neophyte in comparison. That is why no one should believe that the McConnell-crafted health-policy bill is dead, despite the growing opposition and the fact that the overwhelming majority of health-policy analysts and health providers say the bill is a walking disaster. It eviscerates Medicaid—a program widely misunderstood as simply insurance for poor people, but which uses most of its money for long-term care for the elderly, and basic protection for the disabled and mentally ill populations. The overall Medicaid cuts, while spread over a longer time frame, are more severe than the draconian House bill.

But just a week after forecasting the Turnbull-led Coalition government was at risk of drifting to defeat at the next election, Mr Abbott was promoting a tougher stand on the penalty rates decision. He was quoted in The Australian newspaper, where he worked as a journalist before entering politics, as saying the "issue" raised by the Fair Work Commission decision "is not higher wages versus lower wages".

The Liberal Party of Australia is a party of the centre-right which broadly represents business, the suburban middle classes and many rural people. Its permanent coalition partner at national level is the National Party of Australia, formerly known as the Country Party, a conservative party which represents rural interests. These two parties are collectively known as the Coalition. In Queensland, and more recently in NSW, the two parties have officially merged to form the Liberal National Party, and in the Northern Territory, the National Party is known as the Country Liberal Party.

Christianity is for these authors like Anzac: a mythic symbol far removed from the reality of sin, death and sacrifice. Cultural Christianity is free of the burdens of religion such as humility and a consciousness of sin. Instead it promises self-congratulation and pride in the greatness of “Western civilisation”, and is congruent with Trump’s populist nationalism.

"We do not need boys especially sitting in school from the age of four or five to 18," Roberts said. "That is not what many boys want to do."Boys in particular, but also girls, humans in general, learn by doing."Boys, but also girls, and btw also humans.

Few conservative elites are actively practising Christians; most are secular and libertarian in their personal lives. Malcolm Turnbull and Trump, like Ronald Reagan, have a vague relationship with Christianity. There is no Australian equivalent of Vice President Mike Pence as a voice for Christian moral principles in government.

Elections in the six Australian states and two territories are held at least once every four years. In New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and the Australian Capital Territory, election dates are fixed by legislation. However, the other state premiers and the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory have the same discretion in calling elections as the Prime Minister at national level.

The Prime Minister of Australia is Malcolm Turnbull, leader of the Cabinet and head of government, holding office on commission from the Governor-General of Australia. The office of Prime Minister is, in practice, the most powerful political office in Australia. Despite being at the apex of executive government in the country, the office is not mentioned in the Constitution of Australia specifically and exists through an unwritten political convention. Barring exceptional circumstances, the prime minister is always the leader of the political party or coalition with majority support in the House of Representatives. The only case where a senator was appointed prime minister was that of John Gorton, who subsequently resigned his Senate position and was elected as a member of the House of Representatives (Senator George Pearce was acting prime minister for seven months in 1916 while Billy Hughes was overseas).

Since the 2007 elections, the voting patterns of the Australian electorate have shifted. There is more volatility in the Australian electorate than ever before. More Australian voters are swinging between the two major parties or are voting for third parties, with one in four Australians voting for a minor party.

In Australia, evangelical Christians have much less political clout. Family First, established by Pentecostal Christians, has merged with Cory Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives. Their platform does not mention abortion or homosexuality, but celebrates small government. They are selling themselves more as conservatives than Christians.

Normally, a bill this unpopular wouldn’t stand a chance. But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s health-care bill seems designed to let reluctant senators amend it, and claim victory.

When Rufus Edmisten was 31 years old, he delivered a subpoena to the president of the United States asking for tape recordings from the Oval Office. It was July 23, 1973, and “it had to be the hottest day in the world,” he told me last week, 44 years later. Edmisten had recently been appointed deputy chief counsel on the Senate’s newly formed Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities, also known as the Watergate Committee. Its chairman, North Carolina Democrat Sam Ervin, was leading an investigation into the break-in at Democratic National Committee headquarters, which had occurred the year before in the midst of President Richard Nixon’s reelection campaign. It would take another year of firings, cover-ups, and claims of executive privilege, but the committee’s evidence-gathering would ultimately lead to the indictment of 40 administration officials and the first-ever resignation of an American president.

Information and communications technologies are increasingly important in the Australian political landscape. From the adoption of new forms of electoral campaigning to the use of networking technology to organise social movements, media technology has the potential to radically change the way politics is conducted and experienced in this country. The first comprehensive volume on the impact of digital media on Australian politics, this book examines the way these technologies shape political communication, alter key public and private institutions, and serve as the new arena in which discursive and expressive political life is performed. Employing a range of theoretical perspectives, empirical data, and case examples, the book provides insights on political behaviour of Australia’s elites, as well as the increasingly important politics of micro-activism and social media. Energetic and fast-paced, the book draws together a wide range of Australian and international scholarship on the interface between communications technology and politics. Crossing several genres, the book will find a wide audience amongst scholars of both politics and communication, among public relations professionals, and with members of the media themselves.

The strategy was simple. A demographic wave—long-building, still-building—would carry the party to victory, and liberalism to generational advantage. The wave was inevitable, unstoppable. It would not crest for many years, and in the meantime, there would be losses—losses in the midterms and in special elections; in statehouses and in districts and counties and municipalities outside major cities. Losses in places and elections where the white vote was especially strong.

Since federation, there have been 29 Prime Ministers of Australia. The longest-serving Prime Minister was Sir Robert Menzies of the Liberal Party, who served for 19 years from 1939–41, and again from 1949–66. The only other Prime Minister to serve for longer than a decade was John Howard, also of the Liberal Party, who led for more than 11 years from 1996–2007. The Coalition and its direct predecessors have governed at the federal level for a large majority of Australia's history since federation: 30,548 days as compared to Labor's 12,252 days.

His deputy, Julia Gillard, who bulldozed him out of the job, never breathed enough political oxygen, largely because of Rudd's remorseless campaign of undermining.After the electorate turned away from the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd chaos, Liberal Prime Minister Tony Abbott was flummoxed by an electorate-sensitive parliament refusing to pass steep budget cuts and by cabinet unrest. The result was the Turnbull era. But throughout this the political crisis has worsened."The current wave of dissatisfaction can give nobody any comfort," says Greg Lindsay, executive director of the conservative Centre for Independent Studies."In Australia as elsewhere, the grumpiness of the electorate is playing out in ways that could have been foreseen, but too many hoped would just go away." This "disconnect" between a disaffected public and the political establishment "is real and may continue to grow.""However you view politics, yielding to populist demands is a fraught tactic and will not end happily. Australia deserves better from our leaders," Lindsay says.But according to ex-politician Geoff Gallop, the problem lies in the private sector: "big business seems incapable of grasping the big picture – that includes equity as well as efficiency." This causes resentment among workers who "are fearful of change."At the same time, organised labour "doesn't represent the modern workforce in all of its complexity". Compounding the mess is a "cauldron of vested interests" and disputes "associated with the so-called culture wars".The way out of the crisis is to secure bipartisan support for budget repair, constraint on the housing bubble and a national energy policy. But the rancour and bitterness of The Lost Decade make this unlikely.

China’s growing leverage over academia has also come under scrutiny as universities have become increasingly dependent on tuition paid by Chinese students and, in some cases, donations from Chinese benefactors. The fear is that Beijing is using this leverage to stifle critical views.

The other donor, Mr. Huang, moved to Australia six years ago and leads the Australian Council for the Promotion of the Peaceful Reunification of China, which consistently promotes Beijing’s foreign policy positions, including its assertion that Taiwan is part of China and opposition to independence for Tibet. Though such views are common among Chinese, Mr. Huang’s fortune — the holdings of his Yuhu Group range from agriculture to malls — means his voice commands attention.

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said he was preparing legislation to ban foreign political donations. “Just as modern China was based on an assertion of national sovereignty, so China should always respect the sovereignty of other nations, including our own,” he said.

Australia's six states and two territories are structured within a political framework similar to that of the Commonwealth. Each state has its own bicameral Parliament, with the exception of Queensland and the two Territories, whose Parliaments are unicameral. Each state has a Governor, who undertakes a role equivalent to that of the Governor-General at the federal level, and a Premier, who is the head of government and is equivalent to the Prime Minister. Each state also has its own supreme court, from which appeals can be made to the High Court of Australia.

Mounting evidence that Trump’s election was aided by Russian interference presents a challenge to the American system of government—with lasting consequences for democracy. Day by day, revelation after revelation, the legitimacy of the Trump presidency is seeping away. The question of what to do about this loss is becoming ever more urgent and frightening. The already thick cloud of discredit over the Trump presidency thickened deeper Friday, June 23. The Washington Post reported that the CIA told President Obama last year that Vladimir Putin had personally and specifically instructed his intelligence agencies to intervene in the U.S. presidential election to hurt Hillary Clinton and help Donald Trump. Whether the Trump campaign knowingly coordinated its activities with the Russians remains uncertain. The Trump campaign may have been a wholly passive and unwitting beneficiary. Yes, it’s curious that the Russians allegedly directed their resources to the Rust Belt states also targeted by the Trump campaign. But it’s conceivable they were all just reading the same polls on FiveThirtyEight and RealClearPolitics.

UC - Canberra, Bruce On Campus: The unit is delivered on-campus and face to face, supplemented with online content. Most classes are run on weekdays and during business hours.
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A quarter of a century ago, amid another political leadership crisis in Australia, the man who would be the next prime minister told a room full of reporters: "Leadership is not about being popular. It's about being right and about being strong."

One of the donors flagged by Australian intelligence, Dr. Chau, immigrated decades ago. He has long maintained that his campaign contributions are benign and unrelated to the Chinese government. But his profile suggests close ties with the Chinese authorities, and his political contacts in Australia would enhance his stature in China.

The Australian House of Representatives has 150 members, each elected for a flexible term of office not exceeding three years, to represent a single electoral division, commonly referred to as an electorate or seat. Voting within each electorate utilises the instant-runoff system of preferential voting, which has its origins in Australia. The party or coalition of parties which commands the confidence of a majority of members of the House of Representatives forms government.

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